Newsletter Subject

3 Dividend Stocks to Buy and Hold Forever

From

washingtonfinancialpost.com

Email Address

daily@a.washingtonfinancialpost.com

Sent On

Mon, Feb 19, 2024 07:02 PM

Email Preheader Text

The opportunity to buy these 3 stocks at their low prices is ending soon... ? ? February 19 Inve

The opportunity to buy these 3 stocks at their low prices is ending soon...     [Washington-Financial-Post]( February 19 Investment, Political & Business Alerts   [Washington-Financial-Post]( [Washington-Financial-Post]   3 Dividend Stocks to Buy and Hold Forever I've dug through the over 3,000 dividend stocks on the market to pinpoint [3 stocks I believe you should buy and hold forever.]( expect them to increase their dividend payouts in the years to come... so BUYING NOW means you could be picking up shares at an amazing price. - Get them at a discount: Dividend stocks are about to recover from the 2020 crash, meaning there's still time to get shares at a better price than most did in 2019. - Grow your income each month without lifting a finger: As these 3 stocks grow their dividends, you collect more income without investing more cash. - Give yourself more time and freedom: I believe you could buy and hold these 3 stocks forever. Meaning, no wild trading or timing the market. [See these 3 stocks now.]( opportunity to buy these 3 stocks at their low prices is ending soon. [Click here to claim the report on these 3 buy-and-hold dividend stocks set to grow their payouts.]( [Tim Plaehn] Tim Plaehn Editor of The Dividend Hunter P.S. When you go see these 3 stocks, I also have a bonus report to share with you, The 36-Month Accelerated Income Plan to Pay Your Bills for Life. This is my #1 strategy to turn a small $25k stake into an income stream that pays your bills each month. [Go here to see this 2nd report.]( [WASHINGTON FINANCIAL POST]( To guarantee that our emails keep reaching your inbox, kindly add our email address to your address book. Information contained in this email and websites maintained by Magnifi Communities LLC (dba Investors Alley) are provided for educational purposes only and are neither an offer nor a recommendation to buy or sell any security, options on equities, or cryptocurrency. Magnifi Communities and its affiliates may hold a position in any of the companies mentioned. Magnifi Communities is neither a registered investment adviser nor a broker-dealer and does not provide customized or personalized recommendations. Any one-on-one coaching or similar products or services offered by or through Magnifi Communities or Investors Alley does not provide or constitute personal advice, does not take into consideration and is not based on the unique or specific needs, objectives or financial circumstances of any person, and is intended for educational purposes only. Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results. No trading strategy is risk free. Trading and investing involve substantial risk, and you may lose the entire amount of your principal investment or more. You should trade or invest only "risk capital" - money you can afford to lose. Trading and investing is not appropriate for everyone. We urge you to conduct your own research and due diligence and obtain professional advice from your personal financial adviser or investment broker before making any investment decision. All information contained herein is copyright 2024, Magnifi Communities LLC Magnifi Communities | 250 W 34th St | Suite 3910 | New York, NY 10119 At Polaris Advertising, we value your feedback and welcome any questions you may have. However, please keep in mind that providing personalized advice is prohibited by law. You can get in touch with us by calling our toll-free number at Domestic/International: [+1 (302) 499-2858](tel:+13024992858) during our business hours of Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm ET. You can also email us at support@washingtonfinancialpost.comsupport@washingtonfinancialpost.com 124 Broadkill Rd 4 Milton, DE 19968. Polaris Advertising strictly prohibits the reproduction, copying, or redistribution of any of our content, in whole or in part, without prior written permission. The first biography of Ivan Sirko, written by Dmytro Yavornytsky in 1890, gave Sirko's place of birth as the sloboda of Merefa near the city of Kharkiv. Historian Yuriy Mytsyik states that this could not be the case. In his book Otaman Ivan Sirko[2] (1999) he writes that Merefa was established only in 1658 (more than 40 years after the birth of the future otaman). The author also notes that Sirko later in his life did actually live in Merefa with his family on his own estate, and according to some earlier local chronicles there even existed a small settlement called Sirkivka. However, Mytsyik also points out that in 1658–1660 Sirko served as a colonel of the Kalnyk Polk (a military and administrative division of the Cossack Hetmanate) in Podilia, a position usually awarded to the representative of a local population. The author also gives a reference to the letter of Ivan Samiylovych to kniaz G. Romodanovsky (the tsar's voyevoda) in which the hetman refers to Sirko as one born in Polish lands instead of in Sloboda Ukraine (part of Moscovy). Mytsyik also recalls that another historian, Volodymyr Borysenko, allowed for the possibility that Sirko was born in Murafa near the city of Sharhorod (now in Vinnytsia Oblast). The author explains during that time when people were fleeing the war (known as the Ruin, 1659–1686) they may have established a similarly named town in Sloboda Ukraine further east. Part of a series on Cossacks "Zaporozhian Cossacks write to the Sultan of Turkey" by Ilya Repin (1844–1930) Cossack hosts AmurAstrakhanAzovBaikalBlack SeaBuhCaucasusDanubeDonFreeGrebenKubanOrenburgRedSemirechyeSiberianTerekUralUssuriVolgaZaporozhian Other Cossack groups AlbazinanBashkirDanubeJewishNekrasovPersianTatarTurkish History Registered CossacksUprisings KosińskiNalyvaikoKhmelnytskyHadiach TreatyHetmanateColonisation of SiberiaBulavin RebellionPugachev's RebellionCommunismDe-CossackizationCossacks in the SS Notable Cossacks Petro DoroshenkoBohdan KhmelnytskyPetro SahaidachnyIvan MazepaYemelyan PugachevStepan RazinIvan SirkoAndrei ShkuroPavlo SkoropadskyiYermak TimofeyevichIvan Vyhovsky Cossack terms AtamanHetmanKontuszKurinSotniaOseledetsPapakhiPlastunYesaulStanitsaShashkaSzabla vte Further, Mytsyik in his book states that Sirko probably was not of Cossack heritage, but rather of the Ukrainian (Ruthenian) Orthodox szlachta. Mytsyik points out that a local Podilian nobleman, Wojciech Sirko, married a certain Olena Kozynska sometime in 1592. Also in official letters the Polish administration referred to Sirko as urodzonim, implying a native-born Polish subject. Mytsyik states that Sirko stood about 174–176 cm tall and had a birthmark on the right side of the lower lip, a detail which Ilya Repin failed to depict in his artwork when he used General Dragomirov as a prototype of the otaman. Mytsyik also recalls the letter of the Field Hetman of the Crown John III Sobieski (later king of Poland) which referred to Sirko as "a very quiet, noble, polite [man], and has ... great trust among Cossacks".[citation needed] You are receiving this newsletter with advertisements because you opted-in to this service using {EMAIL}. If you wish to discontinue receiving these emails, please click the unsubscribe button below. [View in browser]( [Unsubscribe]( All rights reserved. © 2024 Polaris Advertising.   King attended Durham Elementary School and graduated from Lisbon High School (Maine) in Lisbon Fs, Maine, in 1966.[23] He displayed an early interest in horror as an avid reader of EC horror comics, including Tales from the Crypt, and he later paid tribute to the comics in his screenplay for Creepshow. He began writing for fun while in school, contributing articles to Dave's Rag, the spaper his brother published with a mimeograph machine, and later began selling stories to his friends based on movies he had seen. (He was forced to return the when it was discovered by his teachers.) The first of his stories to be independently published was "I Was a Teenage Grave Robber", which was serialized over four issues (three published and one unpublished) of a fanzine, Comics Review, in 1965. It was republished the follog year in revised, as "In a Half-World of Terror", in another fanzine, Stories of Suspense, edited by Marv Wolfman.[24] As a teen, King also a Scholastic Art and Writing Award.[25] King entered the University of Maine in 1966, and graduated in 1970 with a Bachelor of Arts in English.[26] That year, his daughter Naomi Rachel was born. He wrote a column, Steve King's Garbage Truck, for the student spaper, The Maine Campus, and participated in a writing workshop organized by Burton Hatlen.[27] King held a variety of jobs to pay for his studies, including as a janitor, a gas-station attendant, and an industrial laundry worker. He met his, fellow student Tabitha Spruce, at the university's Raymond H. Fogler Library after one of Professor Hatlen's workshops; they wed in 1971.[27] Son of Mykhailo Sulyma, Ivan came from a petty noble (szlachta) family. He was born in Rohoshchi (next to Chernihiv). He served as an estate overseer for Stanisław Żółkiewski and later the family of Daniłowicze who inherited his lands; for that service in 1620 he was awarded three villages: Sulimówka, Kuczakiw and Lebedyn. All the villages today belong to the Boryspil Raion, Kyiv Oblast. His sons included Stepan (died 1659), a captain of Boryspil company, and Fedir (died 1691), a colonel of Pereiaslav regiment. He became popular among the unregistered Cossacks, leading them on campaigns to plunder Crimea and other Ottoman vassal territories. For organizing a revolt on an Ottoman slave galley and freeing Christian slaves[1] he received a medal from Pope Paul V himself. Eventually, Sulyma reached the rank of the hetman, which he held from 1628 to 1629 and 1630 to 1635. In 1635, after returning from an expedition to Black Sea against the Ottomans, he decided to rebel against the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, which at that time controlled most of the Cossack territories, and whose nobility was trying to turn militant Cossacks into serfs.[citation needed] Ivan Sulyma took part in numerous campaigns of Sagaidachny against Tatars and Turks. In particular, it was the famous capture of Kafa (modern Theodosia), the main center of the slave trade on the Black Sea, Trapezont, Izmail, and also two attacks on Tsaregrad. On the night of 3 to 4 August 1635 he took the newly constructed Kodak fortress by surprise, burning it and executing its crew of about 200 people under Jean Marion. Soon afterwards however his forces were defeated by the army of hetman Stanisław Koniecpolski and Sulima was turned over to the Commonwealth by Cossack elders or starshina. Together with several other leaders of his rebellion, Hetman Sulyma was executed in Warsaw on 12 December 1635. At first, the Polish King Władysław IV Waza, known for his friendly attitude towards the Cossacks, was hesitant to execute Sulyma, especially since he was a person upon whom the Pope himself bestowed his medal. However, pressured by the nobility who wanted to show that no rebellions against the 'established order' would be tolerated, the order for an execution was given; after being tortured, Sulyma was cut to pieces and his body parts were hung on the city walls of Warsaw.[2]

EDM Keywords (218)

years year wrote writes workshops wish whole welcome wed warsaw wanted voyevoda view variety value us urge university unique turned turn turks turkey tsaregrad tsar trying trade touch took tolerated timing time terror teachers tatars take sultan sulima stories spaper sloboda sirko show sharhorod shares share several service served series serialized sell seen see screenplay sagaidachny revolt revised returning return research republished representative report referred reference redistribution recover recommendation receiving received rebellions rebel rather rank rag questions provided provide prototype prohibited possibility position pope poland podilia place pieces picking person people pays pay particular participated ottomans organizing order opted opportunity one offer nobility night newsletter neither mytsyik movies mind military met merefa medal means may market making maine life letter lebedyn leaders law later lands jobs janitor investing invest intended inherited increase income hung horror hold hetman hesitant held guarantee grow graduated given get fun freedom forces forced fleeing first finger feedback family expedition execution executing executed everyone estate established equities email dug dividends displayed discovered detail depict defeated decided dave cut crypt crew creepshow could cossacks content consideration conduct commonwealth comics come colonel collect claim city chernihiv case captain campaigns calling buying buy born birthmark birth bills bestowed believe based bachelor artwork arts army appropriate also afford advertisements according 1970 1966 1965 1658 1635 1630 1629 1628 1620

Marketing emails from washingtonfinancialpost.com

View More
Sent On

16/04/2024

Sent On

13/04/2024

Sent On

12/04/2024

Sent On

10/04/2024

Sent On

10/04/2024

Sent On

09/04/2024

Email Content Statistics

Subscribe Now

Subject Line Length

Data shows that subject lines with 6 to 10 words generated 21 percent higher open rate.

Subscribe Now

Average in this category

Subscribe Now

Number of Words

The more words in the content, the more time the user will need to spend reading. Get straight to the point with catchy short phrases and interesting photos and graphics.

Subscribe Now

Average in this category

Subscribe Now

Number of Images

More images or large images might cause the email to load slower. Aim for a balance of words and images.

Subscribe Now

Average in this category

Subscribe Now

Time to Read

Longer reading time requires more attention and patience from users. Aim for short phrases and catchy keywords.

Subscribe Now

Average in this category

Subscribe Now

Predicted open rate

Subscribe Now

Spam Score

Spam score is determined by a large number of checks performed on the content of the email. For the best delivery results, it is advised to lower your spam score as much as possible.

Subscribe Now

Flesch reading score

Flesch reading score measures how complex a text is. The lower the score, the more difficult the text is to read. The Flesch readability score uses the average length of your sentences (measured by the number of words) and the average number of syllables per word in an equation to calculate the reading ease. Text with a very high Flesch reading ease score (about 100) is straightforward and easy to read, with short sentences and no words of more than two syllables. Usually, a reading ease score of 60-70 is considered acceptable/normal for web copy.

Subscribe Now

Technologies

What powers this email? Every email we receive is parsed to determine the sending ESP and any additional email technologies used.

Subscribe Now

Email Size (not include images)

Font Used

No. Font Name
Subscribe Now

Copyright © 2019–2024 SimilarMail.