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Sᴛʀᴀɴɢᴇ ᴇᴠᴇɴᴛs ʜᴀᴘᴘᴇɴ ɪɴ Cʜɪɴᴀ ᴀʟʟ ᴛʜᴇ ᴛɪᴍᴇ… Bᴜᴛ ᴛʜɪs ᴏɴᴇ ɪs ғʀᴇᴀᴋɪɴɢ ᴍᴇ ᴏᴜᴛ... Tᴀᴋᴇ ᴀ ʟᴏᴏᴋ ᴀᴛ ᴛʜɪs ғᴀᴄᴛᴏʀʏ… [Header](   Hello Fellow Investor! Strange events happen in China аll the time… But this one is freaking me out. Take a look at this factory… [Factory]( Just a few months ago, workers could be seen coming and going in double shifts… But nоw…nothing. No one has been seen entering it for weeks. And it’s not just this factory… This strange occurrence has been happening up and down the Chinese coast. What the heck is going on hеre? [Clісk hеre to discover why Chinese factory workers are disappearing by the hundreds.]( Sean Brodrick, Analyst, Weiss Ratings   e UEFA Euro 1976 Final was the final match of Euro 1976, the fifth edition of the European Championship, UEFA's top football competition for national teams. Contested by Czechoslovakia and West Germany, the match was played at Stadion Crvena Zvezda, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, on 20 June 1976. En route to the final, Czechoslovakia finished top of their qualifying group, which included England, Cyprus and Portugal. After beating the Soviet Union 4–2 on aggregate over a two-legged tie in the quarter-finals, they progressed to the final after defeating the Netherlands 3–1 after exra time in the semi-final. West Germany wn their qualifying group, which included Greece, Malta and Bulgaria, before beating Spain 3–1 on aggregate in the two-legged quarter-final and tournament hosts Yugoslavia 4–2 after xtra time in the single-match semi-final. The final took place in front of 30,790 supporters and was refereed by Sergio Gonella from Italy. Czechoslovakia took the lead in the eighth minute through Ján Å vehlík. Midway through the first half, Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck fouled Koloman Gögh and Marián Masný took the resulting fee kick, which was cleared by Franz Beckenbauer as far as Karol DobiaÅ¡, who struck a half-volley past Sepp Maier, the West Germany goalkeeper, to make it 2–0. Within four minutes, West Germany had halved the deficit as Dieter Müller volleyed Rainer Bonhof's cross into the Czechoslovak goal. In the final minute of regular time, West Germany wn a corner, which was headed past Ivo Viktor by Bernd Hölzenbein at the near post, and the game went into etra time. With no change to the scoe in the additional period, the first penalty shoot-out in a European Championships final ensued. The first seven kicks were converted, until West Germany's fourth penalty taker, Uli Hoeneß, struck his shot over the bar. With the scre 4–3, Antonín Panenka stepped up to take the fifth Czechoslovak penalty. Maier dived while Panenka gently lobbed the ball straight in the middle of the net to wn the match 5–3 and secure Czechoslovakia's first European Championship. Panenka's nae is nw synonymous with that particular style of penalty kick. Background UEFA Euro 1976 was the fifth edition of the UEFA European Football Championship, UEFA's football competition for national teams.[1] Thirty-two teams competed in qualifying rounds,[2] which were played on a hoe-and-away round-robin basis, between 1 September 1974 and 28 February 1976,[3] before the two-legged quarter-finals were held between 24 April and 22 May 1976.[3] The semi-finals and final took place in Yugoslavia, between 16 and 20 June 1976. A third-place play-ff match took place the day before the final.[2] West Germany went into the 1976 Final as reigning European and world champions, having defeated the Soviet Union 3–0 in the UEFA Euro 1972 Final and the Netherlands in the 1974 FIFA World Cup Final.[4][5] Czechoslovakia had failed to progress beyond their group stage of UEFA Euro 1972, finishing level on points with Romania but behind them on goal difference.[6] Czechoslovakia had failed to qualify for the 1974 FIFA World Cup finals when they ended their three-team group stage in second place, behind Scotland.[7] The UEFA Euro 1976 Final was the third competitive fixture between West Germany and Czechoslovakia, the sides having played one another in the 1934 and the 1958 FIFA World Cups.[8] Route to the final Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia's route to the final Round Opposition Scre Qualifying group England 0–3 (A), 2–1 (H) Cyprus 4–0 (H), 3–0 (A) Portugal 5–0 (H), 1–1 (A) Quarter-final Soviet Union 2–0 (H), 2–2 (A) Semi-final Netherlands 3–1 (a.e.t.) (N) Czechoslovakia commenced their UEFA Euro 1976 campaign in qualifying group 1 where they faced three other teams in a hme-and-away round-robin tournament. Their first fixture was against England and was played at Wembley Stadium on 30 October 1974. After a goalless first half, Mick Channon opened the scoring midway through the second half. Two goals in quick succession from Colin Bell secured a 3–0 in for England.[9] Czechoslovakia's next qualifying game came almost six months later, at hme, when they faced Cyprus at the Stadion Letná in Prague. Antonín Panenka scored twice before half-time before completing his hat-trick five minutes after the interval with a penalty. Marián Masný added a fourth goal twelve minutes before full-time to give Czechoslovakia a 4–0 victory.[10] Ten days later Czechoslovakia played Portugal at the Stadion Letná. Přemysl Bičovský scored twice before Zdeněk Nehoda's goal made it 3–0 at half time. Nehoda scored his second almost immeiately after the interval and with a 52nd-minute goal from Ladislav Petráš, Czechoslovakia secured a 5–0 wn.[11] England were Czechoslovakia's next opponents and although the match was originally scheduled for 29 October 1975, it was abandoned after 17 minutes as a result of thick fog. The fixture was fulfilled the following afternoon and although Channon gave England the lead midway through the first half, goals either side of half-time from Nehoda and DuÅ¡an Galis ensured a 2–1 victory for Czechoslovakia.[12] Their next opponents were Portugal at the Estádio das Antas in Porto on 12 November 1975. Anton OndruÅ¡ gave Czechoslovakia the lead in the seventh minute but Nené equalised almost immdiately and no further goals were scored, resulting in a 1–1 draw.[13] The final group match for Czechoslovakia was away against Cyprus at the Tsirio Stadium on 23 November 1975. Nehoda opened the scoring early in the first half before Bičovský and Masný made it 3–0 before half-time. The second half was goalless and the result ensured that Czechoslovakia ended as winners of Group 1, one point ahead of England, and securing progression to the quarter-finals.[14][15] Czechoslovakia faced the Soviet Union there with the first leg being played at Tehelné pole in Bratislava on 24 April 1976.[16] Konstantin Beskov, the Soviet Union manager, had been dismissed following defeat to the Republic of Ireland during the qualifying round. His replacement, Valeriy Lobanovskyi was the Dynamo Kiev manager and selected eight of his club side for the national team. The match was played in wet conditions and Jozef Móder opened the scoring for Czechoslovakia, striking past Aleksandr Prokhorov in the 34th minute. Just after half-time, Panenka doubled Czechoslovakia's lead when his fre kick passed under the Soviet Union's defensive wall and into the bottom corner of the net. Oleg Blokhin missed an opprtunity to reduce the deficit for the Soviet Union late in the second half and the match ended 2–0.[17] The second leg was held at the Central Stadium in Kiev on 22 May 1976.[18] Ivo Viktor, the Czechoslovak goalkeeper, made several saves in the first half, denying Blokhin, Volodymyr Veremeyev and Anatoliy Konkov, before Móder gave Czechoslovakia the lead with a fee kick just before half-time. Eight minutes into the second half, Leonid Buryak equalised but Móder restored Czechoslovakia's lead after a Karol DobiaÅ¡ breakaway with eight minutes remaining. Blokhin sent a chipped shot over Viktor in the 87th minute to make it 2–2, but Czechoslovakia progressed with a 4–2 aggregate victory.[17] In their semi-final, Czechoslovakia's opponents were the Netherlands with the one-ff match being played at the Stadion Maksimir in Zagreb, a neutral venue.[19] The match was played in torrential rain with the referee holding an umbrella over the two captains for the pre-match handshake.[20] Czechoslovakia dominated the early stages and took the lead in the 19th minute when OndruÅ¡ scored with a header from Panenka's fee kick. Jaroslav Pollák was booked for encroaching on the Netherlands' fre kicks and was then sent ff for a foul on Johan Neeskens on the hour mark. With 17 minutes remaining, OndruÅ¡ sliced the ball into the Czechoslovak net when attempting to clear a cross from Ruud Geels to level the scre with an own goal. Neeskens was then dismissed for a foul on Nehoda before Viktor denied Rob Rensenbrink on three separate occasions to send the game into etra time. In the 114th minute, substitute FrantiÅ¡ek Veselý crossed for Nehoda whose header made it 2–1, before Willem van Hanegem of the Netherlands became the third player to be sent ff, for dissent.[21] Four minutes later, Panenka passed to Veselý who avoided Netherlands defender Piet Schrijvers before striking the ball into the goal, securing a 3–1 victory and passage to the final.[22] West Germany West Germany's route to the final Round Opposition Scre Qualifying group Greece 2–2 (A), 1–1 (H) Malta 1–0 (A), 8–0 (H) Bulgaria 1–1 (A), 1–0 (H) Quarter-final Spain 1–1 (A), 2–0 (H) Semi-final Yugoslavia 4–2 (a.e.t.) (N) West Germany were in Qualifying Group 8 and the first match of their campaign was against Greece at the Karaiskakis Stadium in Piraeus on 20 November 1974. Georgios Delikaris scored the nly goal of the first half to give Greece a 1–0 lead at half-time. Bernhard Cullmann equalised for West Germany early in the second half before Kostas Eleftherakis restored Greece's lead with 20 minutes of the game remaining. Herbert Wimmer then levelled the match in the 82nd minute and the game ended in a 2–2 draw.[23] The following month, West Germany faced Malta in the first competitive match between the sides, at the Empire Stadium in Gżira.[24][25] Cullmann gave West Germany the lead just before half-time and with a goalless second half, the match finished 1–0.[25] West Germany's next opponents were Greece who they played at the Rheinstadion in Düsseldorf on 11 October 1975. After a goalless first half, Jupp Heynckes scored midway through the second to give West Germany the lead, but Delikaris equalised with twelve minutes remaining to secure a 1–1 draw.[26] West Germany then played their return fixture against Bulgaria on 19 November 1975 at the Neckarstadion in Stuttgart. The oly goal of the game came midway through the second half as Heynckes' strike secured a 1–0 wn.[27] In their final group game, West Germany's faced Malta at the Westfalenstadion in Dortmund on 28 February 1976. Ronald Worm scored twice and Heynckes added a third before Erich Beer converted a penalty to give West Germany a 4–0 half-time lead. Heynckes and Beer both doubled their tally before Berti Vogts and Bernd Hölzenbein scored late in the game to secure an 8–0 in for their side.[28] West Germany finished top of their group, two points ahead of Greece, and qualified for the quarter-finals.[15] There, West Germany faced Spain in the two-legged tie with the first match taking place at the Metropolitano Stadium in Madrid on 24 April 1976.[29] Santillana gave Spain the lead midway through the first half: outjumping Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck, he controlled Goyo Benito's cross and struck it past Sepp Maier in the West Germany goal. Fifteen minutes into the second half, Beer equalised with a shot from around 25 yards (23 m) which Spain's goalkeeper José Ángel Iribar could not keep out, and the match ended 1–1.[30] The return leg was held at the Olympiastadion in Munich on 22 May 1976.[31] Uli Hoeneß put West Germany ahead in the 17th minute volleyed Beer's cross over his own shoulder to make it 1–0 before Klaus Toppmöller doubled the lead just before half-time when he converted a rebound after Miguel Ángel saved Franz Beckenbauer's shot. The second half was goalless and the match ended 2–0, West Germany progressing with a 3–1 aggregate in.[32] In the semi-final, West Germany's opponents were the host nation Yugoslavia and the match was played on 17 June 1976 at the Crvena Zvezda Stadium in Belgrade.[33] Yugoslavia dominated the first half, Dragan Džajić later suggesting that it was "maybe the est half the Yugoslav national team have ever played".[34] They took the lead in the 19th minute through Danilo Popivoda who controlled Branko Oblak's high ball before outrunning Beckenbauer and striking the ball under Maier. Eleven minutes later, Yugoslavia doubled their lead when Maier failed to keep hold of SlaviÅ¡a Žungul's cross and Džajić scored with his knee, and after Josip Katalinski cleared a shot from Hoeneß of the Yugoslavia goalline, the first half ended 2–0.[34] Midway through the second half, West Germany substitute Heinz Flohe's shot was deflected of Wimmer past Ognjen Petrović in the Yugoslavia goal to halve the deficit. In the 79th minute, West Germany made their second substitution with Wimmer being replaced by Dieter Müller who was making his international debut, and scored with his first touch, a header from a Rainer Bonhof cross to level the scre at 2–2. In the first half of exra time, Yugoslavia had several opportunities to scre but Maier was not beaten. With five minutes remaining, Müller scored again after a Hölzenbein pass, before completing his hat-trick four minutes later, converting a rebound after Bonhof's initial shot had hit the Yugoslavia goalpost. The match ended 4–2 and West Germany progressed to the final.[35] Match Pre-match Müller retained his place in the West Germany team, replacing Dietmar Danner, and Beckenbauer was selected for his 100th cap, an unparalleled achievement for the Germany national football team. Ján Å vehlík came in for Czechoslovakia as Pollák was suspended for the final following his dismissal in the previous match. It was the eighth meeting between the sides, each team having on three of those encounters.[36] The most recent match was a friendly in March 1973 which West Germany on 3–0.[37] Although Czechoslovakia were considered underdogs, Beckenbauer warned that "[Czechoslovakia] as a team is to be estimated higher than Yugoslavia. How strong they are, we have seen in the etra time against Holland, where they were even able to increase [their strength]".[38] Schön was confident of his side's chane to wn: "We have a wnderful team. You can absolutely rely on them."[38] The final was broadcast live in the United Kingdom on the ITV network.[39] Before the match, the teams had agreed that should the result be a draw, then a penalty shoot-out would be used to determine the overall wier, as opposed to a replay the following Tuesday.[40] German magazine Kicker reported that the Germany team had suggested the use of the penalty shoot-out, while author Thomas Roth claimed that the German Football Association had made the decision without consulting their players.[41][38] The Czechoslovak team had prepared for a potential shoot-out while training ahead of the tournament, their manager Václav Ježek deploying hundreds of people behind the goal to intimidate the penalty takers.[42] Summary Antonín Panenka in 2009 Antonín Panenka (pictured in 2009) scored the wning penalty for Czechoslovakia. The final took place on 20 June 1976 at the Red Star Stadium in front of 30,790 supporters and was refereed by Sergio Gonella from Italy.[43] Czechoslovakia took the lead in the eighth minute through Å vehlík: Masný passed to him on the edge of the penalty area and his initial shot was saved by Maier. The rebound fell to Nehoda who passed the ball across the goalmouth, which was missed by OndruÅ¡ but converted by Å vehlík. He was then elbowed in the head by Schwarzenbeck and required medcal treatment, but the West Germany player was not booked. Müller then passed to Viktor down the right wing but Maier came out to block the oportunity to scoe. The Czechoslovak goalkeeper then punched Bonhof's strong shot away before pushing Hölzenbein's curling strike over the crossbar.[44] Midway through the first half, Schwarzenbeck fouled Koloman Gögh and Masný took the resulting fre kick which was cleared by Beckenbauer as far as DobiaÅ¡ who struck a half-volley past Maier to make it 2–0.[45] Within four minutes, West Germany had halved the deficit as Müller scored his fourth international goal in 80 minutes after volleying Bonhof's cross into the Czechoslovak goal.[46] During the half-time interval, the Germany manager Helmut Schön made his first substitution, replacing Wimmer with Flohe.[40] Early in the second half, Flohe relinquished possession and allowed Å vehlík to shoot but the ball flew wide of the West Germany goal. Müller's shot was then blocked by Viktor who claimed the rebound at the feet of Beer. In the 60th minute, a shot from Hoeneß hit a defender and Beer's strike from the rebound was saved by Viktor before Hoeneß then struck the post. Schwarzenbeck cleared a shot from OndruÅ¡ ff the West Germany goalline before Viktor made saves from both Bonhof and Beckenbauer. Nehoda's header hit the West Germany goalpost before Bonhof's deflected fee kick was palmed over the crossbar by Viktor.[46] With around ten minutes remaining, both sides made substitutions, Czechoslovakia's Ladislav Jurkemik coming on for Å vehlík and West Germany's Beer being replaced by Hans Bongartz.[40] In the final minute of regular time, West Germany wn a corner which was headed past Viktor by Hölzenbein at the near post.[46] With the sore level at 2–2 and no time left to re-start, the game went into exta time.[40] Viktor made saves from Flohe and Müller but with no change to the scoreline after the additional 30 minutes, the match went to a penalty shoot-out for the first time in the tournament's history.[46] Masný scored the first penalty kick before Bonhof levelled the shoot-out when his strike went in of the goalpost. Nehoda, OndruÅ¡ and Jurkemik then ll scored for Czechoslovakia while Flohe and Bongartz converted their penalties to make it 4–3 as Hoeneß stepped up to take his kick. Striking it firmly, the ball sailed high over the Czechoslovak crossbar leaving Panenka with the oportunity to in the final for his side should he core. Taking a short and stuttering run-up, he gently struck the ball in an arcing parabola into the net while Maier had already dived and was resting on his knees. The match ended 5–3 with Czechoslovakia nning their first European Championship.[47] Details 20 June 1976 20:15 CET Czechoslovakia 2–2 (a.e.t.) West Germany Å vehlík 8' DobiaÅ¡ 25' Report Positions[48] Müller 28' Hölzenbein 89' Penalties Masný soccer ball with ceck mark Nehoda soccer ball with ceck mark OndruÅ¡ soccer ball with chck mark Jurkemik soccer ball with chck mark Panenka soccer ball with chck mark 5–3 soccer ball with chck mark Bonhof soccer ball with ceck mark Flohe soccer ball with ceck mark Bongartz soccer ball with red X Hoeneß Red Star Stadium, Belgrade Attendance: 30,790 Referee: Sergio Gonella (Italy) Czechoslovakia[49] West Germany[49] GK 1 Ivo Viktor SW 4 Anton OndruÅ¡ (c) RB 5 Ján Pivarník CB 12 Koloman Gögh LB 3 Jozef Čapkovič CM 2 Karol DobiaÅ¡ Yellow card 55' downward-facing red arrow 94' CM 8 Jozef Móder Yellow card 59' AM 7 Antonín Panenka RW 10 Marián Masný LW 11 Zdeněk Nehoda CF 17 Ján Å vehlík downward-facing red arrow 79' Substitutions: DF 6 Ladislav Jurkemik upward-facing green arrow 79' MF 16 FrantiÅ¡ek Veselý upward-facing green arrow 94' Manager: Václav Ježek GK 1 Sepp Maier SW 5 Franz Beckenbauer (c) RB 2 Berti Vogts CB 4 Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck LB 3 Bernard Dietz CM 7 Rainer Bonhof CM 6 Herbert Wimmer downward-facing red arrow 46' AM 10 Erich Beer downward-facing red arrow 80' RW 8 Uli Hoeneß LW 11 Bernd Hölzenbein CF 9 Dieter Müller Substitutions: MF 15 Heinz Flohe upward-facing green arrow 46' MF 14 Hans Bongartz upward-facing green arrow 80' Manager: Helmut Schön Post-match Uli Hoeneß Uli Hoeneß (pictured in 1974) missed the decisive penalty for West Germany. After the match, the sides upheld a pre-match agreement to exchange shirts.[42] Al but three of UEFA's team of the tournament had featured in the final, including six Czechoslovakia and two West Germany players.[2] Hoeneß later described how he had approached his penalty: "I was so exhausted, I was taking no chances, and I hit it with full force. I saw the ball climb higher and higher like a rocket. It whizzed into the clouds. At that moment, everything around me went grey."[47] The European press described Panenka's penalty as "the falling leaf": it has since been replicated by players such as Lionel Messi, Andrea Pirlo and Zinedine Zidane, and is often referred to as "a Panenka".[47][50] David Lacey, writing for The Guardian described Panenka's ing penalty as "a remarkably cool double shuffle ... before scoring with a cheeky little chip."[40] He went on to suggest that while West Germany "had speed, wit and invention", Czechoslovakia were "more direct in their methods, more inclined to launch searching attacks from deep positions".[40] Berliner Zeitung described the final as dramatic and suggested that Czechoslovakia's wn was a "sensation".[51] Fellow Berlin newspaper Neues Deutschland also said the match was "dramatic" and described the Czechoslovakia side as a "brilliant team".[52] Viktor later recalled that he blamed himself for Czechoslovakia conceding the equaliser in the final moments of the match, suggesting that he "wasn't aggressive enough going for the ball", that he had been tired and had lost concentration.[46] Schön had found it difficult to find five Germany players prepared to take part in the penalty shoot-out.[53] Dietz claimed "I'll drop [if I take one]. I'm broken." while Beckenbauer said that he was not sure he could shoot "with this injured shoulder".[46] Schwarzenbeck remarked that he had not taken a penalty kick for nine years, so "why no?" while Maier was unfazed, stating "I'll take one."[46] In a 2020 interview with Czech Television, the Czechoslovakia defender Jozef Čapkovič noted that despite their side being composed of both Czechs and Slovaks, there was a harmonious atmosphere, "It wasn't ... who was from where, but what we were playing for. We played for Czechoslovakia then. There was absolute peace, cohesion."[54] Panenka agreed, stating that the team "was an excellent bunch, cohesive. The atmosphere was absolutely grat ... There was no difference between a Czech and a Slovak "[54] DobiaÅ¡ remarked that Czechoslovakia went into the final without "any worries", and were confident following their victory over the Netherlands.[54] The French newspaper L'Équipe reported that "this final showed a grat dialogue between the playful ease of [Czechoslovakia] and the German football machine. Previously hardly known dimensions were reached."[38] Belgrade's Politika noted that "Czechoslovakia and the Federal Republic left nothing to owe the spectators and played a football dignified of the final. [Czechoslovakia] is completely deservedly the ne champion. The Germans endured the failure calmly and stoically."[38] In Italy, Corriere dello Sport reported that "The sucess has rewarded the unquestionably better team. Germany was deadly wounded in the short time span of 18 minutes in the first half. The Germans have lost the European crown they had wn in Brussels in 1972, but they have confirmed that they are an absolutely world class team."[38] In the following international tournament, the 1978 FIFA World Cup, Czechoslovakia failed to progress past their qualifying group, finishing behind Scotland. West Germany automatically qualified as champions of the 1974 FIFA World Cup but were knocked in the second group stage, placing third behind the Netherlands and Italy.[55]ttle of Dibrivka was a military conflict between Ukrainian insurgents, led by Nestor Makhno and Fedir Shchus, and the Central Powers that were occupying southern Ukraine. It took place on 30 September 1918, towards the end of World War I. The battle began when Makhno, Shchus, and a group of anarchist supporters ambushed Austrian and Ukrainian detachments stationed in Dibrivka. The anarchists were armed with machine guns and were assisted by local peasants, who together captured ammunition, arms, and prisoners of war. It resulted in an insurgent victory and the establishment of an autonomous territory in the region, following the subsequent defeat of the Central Powers. Background Following the October Revolution, a civil war broke out in Ukraine between supporters of the Central Council and the Soviets.[3] During the conflict, Ukrainian anarchists had sided with the Soviets.[4] But following the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, the Central Powers were invited to invade Ukraine.[5] The anarchists were forced to retreat to Russia, where they regrouped in Taganrog and planned to launch a war of independence against the occupying powers.[6] In July 1918, the anarchists returned to Ukraine, finding a situation of unrest among the peasantry, who were beginning to resist the newly established Ukrainian State, a client state of the German Empire.[7] The insurgent leader Nestor Makhno clandestinely returned to his hometown of Huliaipole, where he held secret meetings with other anarchists, with whom he made plans to ignite an insurrection against the occupation forces.[8] On 26 September, Makhno's insurgent group ambushed the Austrian detachment in Huliaipole and seized their weapons and horses. The anarchists then withdrew north to Pokrovske, where they launched another surprise attack against the Austrians and briefly captured the town from the occupying powers.[9] Battle and planning After receiving a number of nw recruits into their ranks, Nestor Makhno's detachment withdrew north to the village of Dibrivka.[10] Following an attack by Austrian reinforcements from Polohy, Makhno's detachment retreated into the nearby forest[11] where they joined forces with another small insurgent detachment led by Fedir Shchus.[12] Shchus's detachment had been sheltering in the forest since July, after a defeat at the hands of the Austrians.[13] While the insurgents discussed the recent advance of Anton Denikin's Volunteer Army in South Russia, on 30 September, the Austrians set up roadblocks around the village, isolating the insurgents in the forest.[14] The combined insurgent forces found themselves surrounded with Austrians stationed along the Vovcha river in the south-east; a German detachment stationed on the high ground with an artillery piece; another Austrian infantry brigade stationed in the north; 200 cavalry of the Ukrainian State Guard stationed in the west; and reinforcements on the way.[13] Makhno devised a plan to break the encirclement—a surprise attack against the troops in the village itself—and managed to convince Shchus to join.[15] Makhno and Shchus selected 30 men to carry out the attack, which was to take place during the day, while the Austrians were resting.[16] Shchus led his smaller detachment to flank from the other side of the village and prepare a Maxim gun for flanking fire. Makhno's larger detachment covertly approached the town square with a Lewis gun, undetected by the Austrians. Most of the Austrian detachment was wiped out in the crossfire. Others turned and fled in a panic.[17] Retreating towards Pokrovske, the Austrians were pursued and captured by the local peasantry, who were themselves armed oly with pitchforks. Makhno himself prevented the peasantry from lynching the Austrians.[18] In the course of the battle, the insurgents managed to capture four machine guns, two truckloads of ammunition and 80 prisoners of war. The captured members of the Ukrainian State Guard and local collaborationist landowners were executed, while the captured Austrians were fed and released on condition of their demilitarisation, stripping them of their kepis before sending them on their way.[19] For his role in their victory, the insurgents bestowed Makhno with the title Batko (Father), which remained his moniker throughout the remainder of the war.[20] Aftermath Following the victory at Dibrivka, the insurgents went on to briefly occupy Huliaipole, which became a center of peasant resistance against the Central Powers. They were swiftly joined by Vasyl Kurylenko in Berdiansk and Petro Petrenko in Hryshyne, which greatly expanded the insurgents' sphere of influence to cover most of Katerynoslav and Northern Tavria.[21] The German commander-in-chief responded by ordering the liquidation of the Ukrainian insurgents.[22] The Austrians and Haydamaks subsequently returned to Dibrivka and bombarded the village with artillery, forcing the insurgents to retreat as the occupation forces set fire to the village,[23] destroying over 600 houses.[24] This prompted fierce reprisals from the insurgents,[25] who in turn set fire to the houses of the wealthy in Harylivka [uk] and Ivanivka [uk],[21] and carried out attacks against the region's Mennonites that had collaborated with the occupation forces.[26] Supported by seizures from the local landowners and with increasing disaffection among the ranks of the occupying forces, the insurrection spread throughout southern and eastern Ukraine, with Tsarekostyantynivka and Dibrivka both briefly falling under anarchist occupation.[27] The insurgents were then pushed south to Temyrivka [uk], where they were defeated in a surprise attack by a Hungarian detachment, killing half the insurgents and wounding their commanders.[28] But following reinforcements by another insurgent detachment led by Simeon Pravda, on 27 November,[29] the anarchists decisively reoccupied Huliaipole, where they established a general staff for an organised Revolutionary Insurgent Army.[30] The Central Powers were subsequently driven out of southern Ukraine and, following their surrender to the Allies, the Ukrainian State was overthrown by the Directorate, which reestablished the Ukrainian People's Republic.[31] On 23 January 1919, Dibrivka played host to the First Regional Congress of Peasants, Workers and Insurgents, which discussed how to strengthen the frontlines against the forces of the Ukrainian nationalists and the White movement.[32] Son after, the Makhnovshchina made a pact with the newly established Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic and the insurgents were integrated into the Red Army.[33] Grand Event brought to you by Inception Media, LLC. 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