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What Kind of Show Is This? By Bill Bonner Friday, March 19, 2021 YOUGHAL, IRELAND ? Yesterday, Sen

[Bill Bonner’s Diary]( What Kind of Show Is This? By Bill Bonner Friday, March 19, 2021 [Bill Bonner] YOUGHAL, IRELAND – Yesterday, Sen. Rand Paul and Dr. Fauci went head-to-head, again. Paul wanted to know why people who have had the virus… or the vaccination… should wear masks, when there is almost zero chance of either getting the virus or spreading it. Fauci replied that there were “variants” that we needed to watch out for, implying that we will have to wear masks forever. It is “just theatre,” Paul shot back. Today, we wonder – and not for the first time – what kind of show we’re talking about. Inflate or Die But first, an update on the markets. In a nutshell, Federal Reserve chief Jerome Powell spoke on Wednesday. Bond prices (which move inversely to yields) fell. And Bloomberg has the story: Treasury Yields Top 1.75% After Powell Spurs Bets on Inflation Treasury yields breached more key levels as bond traders boosted bets that the Federal Reserve will allow inflation to overshoot as the U.S. economy recovers. Yields on the benchmark 10-year note climbed as much as 11 basis points to 1.75% – the highest since January 2020, while the 30-year breached 2.5% for the first time since August 2019. Market measures of inflation expectations are now trading near multi-year highs, with traders paring back bets the Fed would start tightening as soon as late next year. The dollar rebounded against its major peers. The moves came after Fed Chair Jerome Powell indicated he wasn’t concerned over the recent surge in long-term yields – with his focus still on whether financial conditions remained accommodative. Rates have surged this year on expectations that stimulus spending and vaccine rollouts will fuel a sharper economic recovery and a pick up in inflation. The bond bull market – which began 41 years ago – seems to have come to an end last August. If this is so, watch out. It’s “Inflate or Die,” remember. And what’s going to die first are investments that depend on bonds and all forms of fixed income streams – including mortgages, pensions, rents that can’t be raised, and so forth. But let’s leave that for Monday… Today… What to make of the last 12 months? What kind of spectacle was it? Recommended Link [New Cash Law Will Be Disaster for Savers]( [image]( New law has expert warning seniors and retirees to beware. There’s a darker truth behind this political event… [Read the shocking details]( -- Shutdowns and Fearmongering Not wishing to keep you in suspense, here’s our advice to policymakers: It’s time to bring down the curtain. At the beginning of March a year ago, the State of Washington confirmed the second coronavirus death in the nation. A year later, some 539,000 have died reportedly from the disease in the U.S. Most of those still living – and many of those who are already dead (depending on their last tax return) – are now getting thousands of dollars’ worth of stimmy checks, unemployment comp, and tax credits to help them through these trying times. Altogether, the cost of Dr. Fauci’s masks, shutdowns, and fear-mongering (with widespread support from the public and blue-state governors) has risen to about $800 billion (or a bit more than 3% of GDP)… …plus five remedial boondoggles – the Families First Act, CARES Act, Payroll Protection Program, Response and Relief Act, and the last one, the American Rescue Plan – at a cost of $5 trillion, bringing the total to nearly $6 trillion. [Featured: Early investors drooling over this new tech cash cow]( Big Mistake Also in March of last year, it was obvious that this – like the War on Terror and the Wall Street Bailout – was another big mistake. The first reports from Italy showed that the coronavirus was not an indiscriminate killer. Instead, it, like many other diseases, took down the old and the weak… and even as to them, it was not especially frightful. Which leads us to our first insight: We’re all going to die. And since death cannot be put off forever, the question is “when.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that, in the first half of 2020, Americans’ life expectancies had dropped by a “full year” to 77.8 years – blaming COVID-19. This was reported with a straight face by both The New York Times and The Washington Post. And yet, as near as we’ve been able to determine, the average age of a person dying from COVID-19 is… are you ready for this?… 78. In other words, the typical person is better off dying from the coronavirus than from other causes. Recommended Link [Fmr Secretary of State: Biden Devoted to “Great Reset”]( [image]( On January 20th, America entered a new era of government called “The Great Reset.” Renowned investment analyst Jeff Brown explains why the America we all grew up with is about to be dead and buried. [Go here to see his critical briefing.]( -- Homicidal Instinct Meanwhile, the only statistics we trust… and then only somewhat… are the death counts. We want to see the bodies laid out… cold and stiff. Everything else is inferred… contrived… modeled… or subject to interpretation. And what does the body count tell us? Well, here’s our second insight: The COVID-19 was not so bad after all. The plague that struck Athens in 430 BC killed Pericles (Athens’ leader) and a quarter of the population. The Great Plague of 1348 killed half the population of Paris. By contrast, the Plague of 2020 seemed to lack the homicidal instinct. In a year when the killer was on the loose all over the world, the global population actually grew – by 81 million people. [Featured: Gold Could Hit $3,000 on October 22, 2021?]( Vestigial Responsibility What else did we learn? Public health measures are a vestigial responsibility of state and local governments, and some were more eager to join the panic than others. This, of course, was the whole idea of “federalism,” wherein each state would compete with the others to create a more perfect democracy. In the COVID year, the states put in place a rather haphazard and sloppy set of prophylactic measures. Though by no means a perfect laboratory test, it still gives us a chance to compare the different strategies for fighting the coronavirus. In short, some states fought the bug vigorously and aggressively. Others shirked… claimed heel spurs… or otherwise failed to join the fight. And now, with declining caseloads… and a full year of statistical evidence… we are able to draw some tentative conclusions. Recommended Link [Why Financial Super-Collapse Is Near]( [image]( A ground-breaking new financial study has just come out. This study is based on “critical states.” Researchers have found its mathematical fingerprints in the workings of all giant upheavals. But recently, they have taken this study one step further in relation to the markets. And what they have revealed is one of the most stunning and eye-opening financial revelations you may ever learn! [Click here for details.]( -- Tentative Conclusions As of March 8, Hawaii had the fewest deaths – just 32 per 100,000. New Jersey had the most, 270. So, our third insight: If you want to avoid dying from an infectious disease, it is best to live on an island. Between New Jersey and Hawaii is a whole continent with a whole range of death statistics. And here’s our next takeaway: In the end, it didn’t seem to matter what the states did. In this regard, Florida is worth looking at more closely, which is just what The New York Times did last week. We’ll let the “Old Grey Lady” provide the takeaway: The lockdowns didn’t work… Florida reopened months before much of the rest of the nation, which only in recent days has begun to emerge from the better part of a year under lockdown… The unemployment rate is 5.1%, compared to 9.3% in California, 8.7% in New York and 6.9% in Texas. That debate about opening schools? It came and went months ago. Children have been in classrooms since the fall… Yet Florida’s death rate is no worse than the national average, and better than that of some other states that imposed more restrictions, despite its large numbers of retirees, young partyers and tourists. Caseloads and hospitalizations across most of the state are down. The Times cannot bring itself to admit that it was partly to blame for whipping up the hysteria. Instead, as if it had failed to understand its own insight, it adds: The tens of thousands of people who died were in some ways the result of an unspoken grand bargain — the price paid for keeping as many people as possible employed, educated and, some Floridians would argue, sane. But that was just the point. The death rates – which are all over the place – show no such bargain. Which is our final insight: The show turned out to be a surprising farce. Whether you locked down tightly or not at all seemed to make no statistical difference... And the heroes (such as New York governor Andrew Cuomo) turned into villains… while the buffoon (Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida) turned out to be not such an idiot after all. Regards, [signature] Bill --------------------------------------------------------------- Like what you’re reading? Send your thoughts to [feedback@rogueeconomics.com](mailto:feedback@rogueeconomics.com?subject=What kind of show is this?). --------------------------------------------------------------- MAILBAG A dear reader offers his thoughts on government influence in Friday’s Diary, “[Reflections on Reflections]( Another thought: Perhaps the question is not is it good or bad, or right or wrong. Perhaps it’s: Is it necessary for the development of mankind? If we allow our reasoning to advance this far, it opens up a whole new spectrum. Could there be reason to believe that we, government (mankind), is not in control? Mother Nature (the universe) is a known powerful force. Recorded history, the Hebrew scripture, reminds us. – Bill M. Meanwhile, others give their take on Monday’s missive, “[A Bad Bet]( and Tuesday’s essay, “[An Alternative History]( The national debt will not be paid with more taxes. The new, free money just devalued the old money. The people who pay for the debt are those who save money, earn stagnant wages, and those who try to run a business with increased costs. What part of “redistributing the wealth” doesn’t anyone understand? Those who create the wealth will lose it. – Ben H. The Founding Fathers were fully aware of the graft and greed that are part of government and tried to keep it from becoming part of the new American Republic. But our self-serving career politicians have ruined us. Thank you for continuing to keep us up to date, even when it sometimes offends us. – Roger W. How can America protect itself from the harmful effects of career politicians? Are those who create wealth most at risk of losing it? Write us at [feedback@rogueeconomics.com](mailto:feedback@rogueeconomics.com?subject=What kind of show is this?). IN CASE YOU MISSED IT… [It’s OFFICIAL: 93,862 Millionaires Minted (Get the Ticker Below)]( Legendary Fund Manager Bill Miller said no other asset has more upside potential than [this investment. (Get the ticker here.)]( He might be right because so far, it has already minted 93,862 paper millionaires. Make no mistake; this could be the hottest tech investment of 2021. [Get the ticker symbol here. No strings attached.]( [image]( --------------------------------------------------------------- Get Instant Access Click to read these free reports and automatically sign up for daily research. [image]( [How to Earn Free Bitcoin]( [image]( [The Trader’s Guide to Technical Analysis]( [image]( [An Insider’s Guide to Making a Fortune from Small Tech Stocks]( [Rogue Economincs]( Rogue Economics 55 NE 5th Avenue, Delray Beach, FL 33483 [www.rogueeconomics.com]( [Share]( [FACEBOOK]( [Tweet]( [TWITTER]( To ensure our emails continue reaching your inbox, please [add our email address]( to your address book. This editorial email containing advertisements was sent to {EMAIL} because you subscribed to this service. To stop receiving these emails, click [here](. Rogue Economics welcomes your feedback and questions. But please note: The law prohibits us from giving personalized advice. To contact Customer Service, call toll free Domestic/International: 1-800-681-1765, Mon–Fri, 9am–7pm ET, or email us [here](mailto:memberservices@rogueeconomics.com). © 2021 Rogue Economics. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, copying, or redistribution of our content, in whole or in part, is prohibited without written permission from Rogue Economics. [Privacy Policy]( | [Terms of Use](

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